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Postby lillo9546 » Fri Dec 13, 2019 10:44 am

  lillo9546
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Subject title: Art path for drawing animation/manga style

What're your Books, Lessons, Videos, advice to learn anatomy, gesture, proportion, style, color, and such other stuff for illustration for animation/manga style characters. I post some examples of what I aim to reach. I love how shapes work on those drawings, and I would like to learn the way to see and to think when drawing this type of illustrations.
https://imgur.com/a/apKWKZ3
I know the basics stuff because I can perfectly do a Portrait with a very good result, but when it comes to having a reference in front of me, I wanna do my illustration style.. based on that, I wanna do my "view" like those artists do theirs!

 

Postby supremeleaderbobo » Fri Dec 13, 2019 4:58 pm

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this is an interesting question...i'd be really interested in seeing some of your portraits and maybe that would help me get a better idea.

the art you're referencing is pretty realistic, although i can clearly see the anime/manga influences going on. i think for the most part, those pictures are really quite close to reality, so it might help you a good deal to study real faces quite a bit, or maybe ones that have the features that are clear in these paintings, being small noses, big eyes, but i wouldn't recommend studying an anime or manga book if you're trying to paint like this.

i would take a look at the ever popular ross draws and see how he strikes somewhat of a balance between realism and exaggeration. doing studies and copies helps a lot too, and finding out proportions.

if i'm being totally honest, having books is nice, but if you learn to analyze proportions and subtle details of a piece while you're doing a copy, that will probably be more beneficial.
hey man you like drawing wow crazy me too what are the odds wow small world wow

 

Postby Agitato » Fri Dec 13, 2019 7:23 pm

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I'm going for a similar style myself actually! I can't be sure my method of studying is optimal or anything, but I think it's apparent in these examples that you'd first need to build a solid understanding of painting realistically. Once this is established, you can tweak it to your own stylistic tastes, but since realism is relied on as the foundation, I'd recommend studying for that first probably. It's just easier to honestly gauge your own ability when you have good ref to directly compare it to, without style to add another layer of confusion to things.

Like @supremeleaderbobo said, it'd be easier to give advice seeing where your portraits are at now. Style can either emerge naturally from simplifications (derived from reality) that you personally like using, or it can be practiced by emulating whatever preexisting style you want to move towards (e.g. taking a realistic portrait and anime-fying the features). But to do this I'd again recommend that you have a good grasp of fundamentals first.

So to answer the question briefly, I'd recommend the same books/videos you'd study for realistic art. Style is something that is just applied on top of the fundamentals, and if you don't have them down yet, style will only muddy the waters imo.
Sincerely.

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Postby supremeleaderbobo » Sat Dec 14, 2019 3:43 pm

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this video summarizes the whole discussion reaaaaaaaaaally well:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMUYG1h ... nnel=Sycra
hey man you like drawing wow crazy me too what are the odds wow small world wow

 

Postby Agitato » Sat Dec 14, 2019 7:58 pm

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@supremeleaderbobo oh yeah this video is perfect lol. I haven't watched this far back into sycra's older videos ._.

That part about anime styles being a bit "inbred" actually perfectly hit on how I feel about a lot of styles based on preexisting, popular styles. You end up with derivatives of derivatives of derivatives, and for newer artists that causes all sorts of problems and weird degeneration since they don't have grounding in fundamentals (reality). Interesting topic.
Sincerely.

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Postby supremeleaderbobo » Sat Dec 14, 2019 8:06 pm

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yeah, i think he really summarizes it well when he says that if you know the fundamentals, you can stylize them however you want, but its basically impossible to go the other way.
hey man you like drawing wow crazy me too what are the odds wow small world wow

 

Postby Mystipen » Tue Dec 24, 2019 2:43 pm

  Mystipen
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If you want a clear path set out for you, then you'll have to find some sort of art school that would create that path for you. However, if you are studying on your own then I really would recommend focusing on the fundamentals of drawing first, which are: perspective, composition, and rendering. You really only need to know those three to start copying and doing studies of other artworks, and knowing those fundamentals first in my opinion makes anatomy much easier to understand since you know how to turn a form in 3D space already. The reason I did not include proportions and all the other minute fundamentals is because you can generally include them in the fundamentals I listed earlier. For example, perspective has a major influence on proportions due to foreshortening so knowing how to calculate foreshortening will allow you to get a grasp on proportions much easier. You can memorize the human body proportions, but if you can't accurately translate them into 3D space then it is just wasted effort.

You should really research the path those artists took in order to get a more solid view of how you should approach learning. GUWEIZ for example, has been studying WLOP's & Illya Kuvshinov's work for a long-time to the point that he was being called a copy cat by many people due to their similarities in style. Though, GUWEIZ mentioned that the reason he did so is because he knew that he couldn't expect to have his own style with just two years of drawing experience and that he would rather be called unoriginal than flaunt an original style that is clearly flawed which shows you his commitment to his craft. Losih went to art school I believe, and Illya Kuvhshinov did the same and he had an extensive background with perspective. Although, I am not that familiar with those two. Though, I think you get the point, do your research on the artists to get a better view of how to set your own path and there is nothing wrong with studying their work because it will allow you to learn more at the end of the day.

Now I will include some recommendations. If you are just starting out, then I recommend doing a bit of drawabox to build your mechanical drawing skills, but if you feel like you have some solid ability to draw straight lines, curves, and ellipses then you can move on from that. The books I recommend are: Scott Robertson's How to Draw, Michael Hampton's figure drawing book, and CTRL + Paint's paid resources. Currently I am studying those three resources, and I think they are worth the money for the amount of information that they give away. It is just a matter of committing your time to studying them.

On top of your studying of fundamental resources, I recommend you do master studies of the artists you like. For example, try recreating GUWEIZ's work while applying the techniques you learned from the above resources, it will not only teach you how to use them in practical situations but also will help you build confidence. I am already doing these sort of studies on my own, so if you want me to show you some of them, then you are more than welcome to PM me.

The last thing I am going to mention is, if you are serious about improving consistently, then I recommend you start using a calendar to schedule specific times where you will study. I can't emphasize how much setting up a schedule is important, it is a good system to ensure that you will stick to the plan instead of doing things spontaneously. The point of this scheduling habit is to create a structure which will create your ideal day, but also ensure that you follow the plan you originally assigned. I'll leave a video link down below that explains why this is important more than I can:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AX6KysULMg

[EDIT]: If your goal is to make illustrations, then you should do illustrations on top of your fundamental studies as finishing an illustration is a skill of its own.

 

Postby CaptainKiryu » Thu Jan 30, 2020 12:26 am

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Ahmed and Sinix talked about this sort of thing a bit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FSFbTx ... C&index=32

I mean, I think you need to be able to identify what makes that style what it is and what parts of it you like best so that you can find your own personal sweet spot to work toward.
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