Have some questions? Want answers? Got some good tips? This is the place to ask, or answer, questions regarding art tools, and methods.

Moderators: Ambiguity, SeaQuenchal, virtueone

 

Postby Kwaku » Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:54 am

  Kwaku
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:33 am

Subject title: Advice for second guessing and fatigue

For a few months now, I've been studying offline (mostly anatomy) on my own. On an average day I'd do about 6-8 hours of study and I'd feel like I've learned something. Now (about 2 months later) it feels like I'm not gettin any better, I dont know what to do and that's killing me. I dont want to take a day off because I want to keep my habit of studying everyday going and I'm scared of wasting time. Any advice?

 

Postby Josephcow » Fri Mar 16, 2018 2:17 am

User avatar
  Josephcow
Posts: 821
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:46 pm

Take a day off. Get some new perspective.

Sometimes it feels like we've actually gone backward, but it's that our eyes have developed, but our actual skills have not caught up. Maybe now you can see all sorts of issues with your drawings that you didn't seem to have before. This is a good thing!

Honestly I don't see how it can be healthy to believe that if you take even one day off you will be wasting time. That's a damaging way to think. Especially because art is not a perfect time in, skills out kind of thing. Of course discipline is important, but what you do, and the lessons you learn matter even more than how much time you spend, or how many pages you fill.

Life necessitates that we have to be away from our studies sometimes for days or weeks, and you have to be okay with that. If you love art, and drawing, you will continue to go back to it even if you take a week or more off.

 

Postby DarkLored123 » Fri Mar 16, 2018 4:30 pm

  DarkLored123
Posts: 315
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 6:18 pm

I recommend that you do personal projects a check-marker for how much progress you have made. Just practicing over and over won't satisfy you because, you will never see the fruits of your labor pay off if you do not take on a project that requires you to think critically using the experience you've gained practicing. Make sure that the personal projects that you make are reasonable, you want to have a challenge with them but do not go overboard with it and exceed your level of competency because it'll only end up frustrating you when you fail, and you will feel like all the work you put in to practice did not pay off.

Another tip for when you feel like second guessing yourself. If you feel lost and do not know what you need to do to increase your skill level, go and seek out a professional artists who specializes in the field you are interested in and ask them for a critique. I cannot emphasize enough how a critique from an artist that has actual experience and is competent is much more valuable than a critique you can get just about anywhere from people around your level. Some may disagree with the statement I made, but it is undeniable that someone with a lot of experience is much more reliable than someone who can just point out your mistakes. Make sure the person who is critiquing you is capable of assessing you in a manner of strengths/weaknesses, in my opinion critiques that tell you what is wrong with your drawing without stating the root of the issue are just useless. Getting a critique saved me many times, it gave me directions because now I know what I need to work on, and it also boosted up my motivation so that the next time I ask for the critique I'd have an extra layer of experience under my belt.

I also want to address the amount of hours you put in. It is fine and dandy that you put 6-8 hours of work into practice and in fact it is brilliant , but make sure you are utilizing it correctly. It is very easy to fall into a state of focus where your thoughts are processed sub-consciously, and it can make you go on auto pilot for most of the hours you spend. When practicing you want to make conscious decisions because it'll allow you to objectively look at your work and spot mistakes much more easily, you are also utilizing your knowledge that you know. I was also in a similar situation as you during my break from college and ended up wasting an entire month because I was not aware that I was not thinking properly while drawing.

Hope this helped you out.

 

Postby Josephcow » Sat Mar 17, 2018 2:45 am

User avatar
  Josephcow
Posts: 821
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:46 pm

DarkLored123 wrote:
go and seek out a professional artists who specializes in the field you are interested in and ask them for a critique. I cannot emphasize enough how a critique from an artist that has actual experience and is competent is much more valuable than a critique you can get just about anywhere from people around your level... in my opinion critiques that tell you what is wrong with your drawing without stating the root of the issue are just useless.



This is so true. I recently learned this myself, the opinion of someone that really knows what they're doing is worth so much in putting you back on track (so not me lol). I've found that professional artists are sometimes kind enough to give a suggestion or two for free if you ask. There might be essential things to consider about your drawing that you haven't even heard of! I think the 'superficial' critique has it's place also in the case of wanting to fix up one individual piece.

 

Postby Kwaku » Sat Mar 17, 2018 4:51 am

  Kwaku
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 7:33 am

DarkLored123 wrote:I recommend that you do personal projects a check-marker for how much progress you have made. Just practicing over and over won't satisfy you because, you will never see the fruits of your labor pay off if you do not take on a project that requires you to think critically using the experience you've gained practicing. Make sure that the personal projects that you make are reasonable, you want to have a challenge with them but do not go overboard with it and exceed your level of competency because it'll only end up frustrating you when you fail, and you will feel like all the work you put in to practice did not pay off.

Another tip for when you feel like second guessing yourself. If you feel lost and do not know what you need to do to increase your skill level, go and seek out a professional artists who specializes in the field you are interested in and ask them for a critique. I cannot emphasize enough how a critique from an artist that has actual experience and is competent is much more valuable than a critique you can get just about anywhere from people around your level. Some may disagree with the statement I made, but it is undeniable that someone with a lot of experience is much more reliable than someone who can just point out your mistakes. Make sure the person who is critiquing you is capable of assessing you in a manner of strengths/weaknesses, in my opinion critiques that tell you what is wrong with your drawing without stating the root of the issue are just useless. Getting a critique saved me many times, it gave me directions because now I know what I need to work on, and it also boosted up my motivation so that the next time I ask for the critique I'd have an extra layer of experience under my belt.

I also want to address the amount of hours you put in. It is fine and dandy that you put 6-8 hours of work into practice and in fact it is brilliant , but make sure you are utilizing it correctly. It is very easy to fall into a state of focus where your thoughts are processed sub-consciously, and it can make you go on auto pilot for most of the hours you spend. When practicing you want to make conscious decisions because it'll allow you to objectively look at your work and spot mistakes much more easily, you are also utilizing your knowledge that you know. I was also in a similar situation as you during my break from college and ended up wasting an entire month because I was not aware that I was not thinking properly while drawing.

Hope this helped you out.
You're right about everything. I'm definitely gonna put all this into practice. You were right about the way I was studying, it's like I'd binge on information for hours and very little of it would digest. Also Josephcow has had me thinking about taking breaks. I'm thinking of studying in pomodoros from now on. Thank you both for the advice, this really helped.


Return to Art Questions and Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests