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Postby wheattoast86 » Mon Jan 01, 2018 9:39 pm

  wheattoast86
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2018 8:55 pm

Subject title: I feel like I am not doing enough

I have drawn frequently before, but I haven't started to devote myself to improving my art until a couple days ago. I deconstructed my main goal in art, some what organized what to do, and developed a schedule.
I have 90 minute sessions with 15-20 minute breaks every day; 2 sessions every weekday and 1 every weekend. I keep a Google Slides presentation on what to do. For the past couple of days, my main goal to accomplish was to under my goal in art and how to improve. The only drawing I have accomplished are a couple of life drawings and an iterative practice on drawing lines, cylinders, cubes, and ellipses. As I was reading articles on how to improve as an artist, I came across a couple of schedules. In some of the schedules, they decided to devote 5 hours a day to many art subjects. I feel like what I am doing is not enough, focusing on one subject for roughly about a week and try to improve it, then moving on. What should I do to improve?

 

Postby DarkLored123 » Wed Jan 03, 2018 8:29 pm

  DarkLored123
Posts: 315
Joined: Wed Jul 06, 2016 6:18 pm

Do not feel obligated to spend 5+ hours a day drawing if you do not think you'll be able to handle it, numbers don't always amount a greater outcome. I can tell you from personal experience that a well thought out hour or two of drawing is as good as drawing for 5 hours straight if you efficiently planned on what you need to work on. Also these articles usually run on assumptions that are completely not supported with any evidence, it is like saying that if you want to get good at math you have to do it for 5 hours a day which is rubbish.

So if you really want to improve then you need to constantly ask yourself whether what you are doing during your sessions is sufficient enough in terms of efficiency, if you are doing life drawings try to understand what skills are required to accomplish the task and which one of those skills you want to practice. If it is perspective for example, it is always good to start by drawing basic shapes using the grid and when you build confidence slowly start drawing those same shapes without the grid and give them depth. Study smart is what I am getting at, spending x amount of hours does not always result in a desired result, you could be spending 7-8 hours a day drawing but at the end of the day if your focus is on the wrong material then it is pointless.

If you want to improve simply practice the fundamentals, life drawing is too broad in my opinion, what skill are you trying to improve on each session? You need to ask yourself these questions all the time if you want to create a good study strategy to pull results out, so instead of thinking about life drawing while doing it why not focus on how the perspective works when you look at a human from a specific angle? or what forms is the human built of from? You need to isolate skills in order to get good at them, you can't practice everything together and have an expectation that you'll somehow improve at all of them, it is like saying that you are going to read a textbook and take on 4 to 5 chapters at the same time without properly reading all of them in order and practicing them individually.

That is my two cents, in my opinion the most important skills to create good drawings is the understanding of perspective, form & shapes, proportions, and dynamism.

 

Postby wheattoast86 » Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:22 pm

  wheattoast86
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jan 01, 2018 8:55 pm

DarkLored123 wrote:Do not feel obligated to spend 5+ hours a day drawing if you do not think you'll be able to handle it, numbers don't always amount a greater outcome. I can tell you from personal experience that a well thought out hour or two of drawing is as good as drawing for 5 hours straight if you efficiently planned on what you need to work on. Also these articles usually run on assumptions that are completely not supported with any evidence, it is like saying that if you want to get good at math you have to do it for 5 hours a day which is rubbish.

So if you really want to improve then you need to constantly ask yourself whether what you are doing during your sessions is sufficient enough in terms of efficiency, if you are doing life drawings try to understand what skills are required to accomplish the task and which one of those skills you want to practice. If it is perspective for example, it is always good to start by drawing basic shapes using the grid and when you build confidence slowly start drawing those same shapes without the grid and give them depth. Study smart is what I am getting at, spending x amount of hours does not always result in a desired result, you could be spending 7-8 hours a day drawing but at the end of the day if your focus is on the wrong material then it is pointless.

If you want to improve simply practice the fundamentals, life drawing is too broad in my opinion, what skill are you trying to improve on each session? You need to ask yourself these questions all the time if you want to create a good study strategy to pull results out, so instead of thinking about life drawing while doing it why not focus on how the perspective works when you look at a human from a specific angle? or what forms is the human built of from? You need to isolate skills in order to get good at them, you can't practice everything together and have an expectation that you'll somehow improve at all of them, it is like saying that you are going to read a textbook and take on 4 to 5 chapters at the same time without properly reading all of them in order and practicing them individually.

That is my two cents, in my opinion the most important skills to create good drawings is the understanding of perspective, form & shapes, proportions, and dynamism.


Thank you so much for answering! I will try to organize a more efficient way to learn the fundamentals and such.

 

Postby Josephcow » Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:45 pm

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  Josephcow
Posts: 795
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:46 pm

you do 90 minutes twice a day every day? Well geez I don't draw for 3 hours every single day. I think that's great!
I agree with DarkLored, it's not a time in --> skills out kind of thing. You're already making time in your day to study art which is really the hard part for most people. If you're improving, then what's the problem? If you're not improving, then what's actually the problem? Because it's more than likely not that you need to draw for 5 hours instead of 3. It's probably what you're actually doing during those 3 hours.

Since you said you just started this routine a couple days ago (I sense a new years resolution being made), give yourself a few weeks and see if you can keep it up. Then worry about changing your schedule. Post stuff to your sketchbook if you have one so we can see what you're working on!


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