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Postby Kavilen » Mon Apr 23, 2018 2:44 am

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Subject title: Confused.... Also, advice?

I really wanted to become a concept artist and later on, a graphic novelist. Recently, though, I've pretty much given up. I feel like I'm making no progression, and it makes it to the point where I have to force myself to draw anything. I don't really want to let go of it, since it was the only passion I really have. What do you guys suggest I do?
Last edited by Kavilen on Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:10 am, edited 3 times in total.

 

Postby Audiazif » Mon Apr 23, 2018 3:31 am

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There is no one on here or anywhere that can make that call for you. The only one who can make that decision is you. If it really is your passion then keep going for it and keep trying to make it happen. It might not happen when you want it to or how you want it to but if you stick with it something is bound to happen.
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Postby svarn » Mon Apr 23, 2018 3:38 pm

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We don't know your circumstances, your work etc. so it's going to be vague.
But when people say "it'll take couple years of dedicated practice to learn", they're not just messing with you, that's just how long it takes to get to somewhat professional level.

When I feel like I make no progress and I want to quit, I tend to use that anger to shake things up. Maybe I've been just doodling around pointlessly and it's time to get serious about progress. Maybe I draw for like an hour every other day, and I expect results, it might be time to get more serious. Maybe it's time to look for a critique from someone much better then me, or sign-up for some course to give me that extra kick needed to get back into things. But maybe it's time to take a break, cool off and try again in 2 weeks, or don't. You don't neccesarily need to be an artist.

 

Postby Plumbum » Mon Apr 23, 2018 6:42 pm

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OK, so we have DID (like Sycra, basically) but I'm sure this tip can apply to everyone on some level...

If we only focus on drawing it gets really boring and we start becoming really unproductive. What has really helped us is to do other things as well. We are personally going between art, coding, and literature. You probably don't have to do it quite at the level we do everything at, but taking up a few hobbies can give you the change of pace that you really need when doing art gets too boring -- you know -- when you do something else you can go back to your study with new found passion!

Another thing that really works well is to take up a bit of exercise. Exercise have been proven to increase happiness and decrease chance of depression -- things very important for productive work!

The last tip I have is to have fun in-between your hard studies -- not only does that help your imagination drawing but it also helps you remembering why it is you are learning how to draw in the first place.

Edit: DID is that we are multiple people sharing the same body. I should probably mention that. These tips aren't exclusive to people with DID though, plenty of successful people do the same as us -- I know a scientist from Cambridge who is doing art, geology among other things while professionally being a theoretical physicist.
We have DID (the thing Sycra has).

Quick summary of forum writers:
Artist: she is mainly the one who draws.
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Sketchbook: http://www.sycra.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=14540

 

Postby Moe » Wed Apr 25, 2018 2:19 pm

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In weight training, there is something called a deload week whereby you take an entire week off from weight training every 3 months or so. This is done in order to give the body proper rest so it can fully repair and heal itself. While art may not be as physically straining it does take up a lot of mental energy and i think much like weight training, it's imperative to schedule breaks into your routine. I would recommend taking a break from art and perhaps consuming whatever it was that got you drawing in the first place. Hopefully, by the end of the week, you'll get your "itch" back to draw.
Yolo

 

Postby Kavilen » Thu Apr 26, 2018 1:07 am

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Thank you all for your words as they helped me. I'm going to continue drawing as much as I can. This tends to be a normal thing for me to go through where I feel like quitting and then will just get back into it. I plan on finding some courses to take online, since doing this without any sort of knowledge as to what I'm doing isn't helping. I might do some exercise later on when I gain weight, since I would only be killing my body even more (about 60-80 lbs underweight :?)

 

Postby Plumbum » Thu Apr 26, 2018 2:05 am

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Kavilen wrote:Thank you all for your words as they helped me. I'm going to continue drawing as much as I can. This tends to be a normal thing for me to go through where I feel like quitting and then will just get back into it. I plan on finding some courses to take online, since doing this without any sort of knowledge as to what I'm doing isn't helping. I might do some exercise later on when I gain weight, since I would only be killing my body even more (about 60-80 lbs underweight :? )


Proko is my go to online resource! He has both free and paid videos.

I hope you are dealing with your weight okay, I cannot imagine it being nice being so underweight. Just keep on fighting!
We have DID (the thing Sycra has).

Quick summary of forum writers:
Artist: she is mainly the one who draws.
Writer: he is usually the one who writes on the forum.
Lawyer: he studies everything, honestly.
Real names are private.

Sketchbook: http://www.sycra.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=14540

 

Postby CaptainKiryu » Mon Apr 30, 2018 3:12 am

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I guess in the future when you feel like quitting again maybe think about why you're drawing. Did drawing add value to your life before you got all these ideas about concept art and comic books? Do you already like drawing designing to solve problems or telling stories or did you just think that those jobs were your only options? Do you have those goals in mind because doing that work is rewarding to you or you think that doing that work will get you some other rewards like respect, or fame, or admiration? What's more important to you, drawing for a living or drawing whatever you want?

If you don't actually want to do those things, then quit or find a different goal. If you can find an art job better suited to things you actually draw, then set your sights there. If you like to draw, but there's no money in it, then do something else for a career and draw what you want in your free time.

As for the progression, I don't think it's possible to make no improvement if you're drawing a lot and drawing with purpose. Maybe try re-drawing some really old stuff with your new knowledge and skills for a confidence boost.

I feel like I've been rather blunt here, but I suppose if it seems to harsh, just ignore it. The important thing is to keep moving forward.
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Postby Snakebreath » Tue May 29, 2018 3:26 am

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That feeling never goes away in my experience. I've been working in the animation industry for 2 years now, currently on my second project. I get paid to draw/paint all day, that was my ultimate goal and I STILL feel like giving up. It's always easy to find a million reasons to give up no matter your circumstance, the real challenge is continuing on. That's how you know you really want it, with 100 reasons facing you to give up you keep trying.

At the end of the day no one can really give you that "magic" answer. You'll either want it bad enough to make the necessary sacrifices or you'll keep it as a hobby and pursue a different field of work.

 

Postby perkexpert » Tue May 29, 2018 10:01 pm

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Wise words Snake....you've really grown! ;)
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Postby Kavilen » Wed May 30, 2018 9:52 am

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Thank you all for your words! I went through the same feeling again and didn't draw for a month, but I'm slowly getting back into it. I really want to be an artist and I still have the same reasons that got me started. Maybe I should start a sketchbook here to keep me motivated?

 

Postby Ambiguity » Thu May 31, 2018 6:15 pm

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Kavilen wrote:Maybe I should start a sketchbook here to keep me motivated?

Yes, you should, but don't do it for the comments/praise. Do it to track your progress and see where you can improve.

 

Postby Kavilen » Sat Jun 02, 2018 12:15 am

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That was the idea I had in mind. :D I'm going to start posting today and Ill try and post something every 1-3 days.

 

Postby Kavilen » Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:18 am

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Welp. Sorry guys, but I cant anymore. Im putting down my pencil for good now. I guess I could never truly have fun with art. Instead, I get super depressed after a drawing session :| . Wish you all luck on your art and hope you guys can reach new heights! As for me, I dont really have any other passions, so I guess Ill just work a hard labor job. Anyways, I'll visit every now and then to see you guys improve.

 

Postby Josephcow » Thu Jun 07, 2018 10:59 pm

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I can't really tell you to keep going or quit. But I think we've all felt similar about drawing -- frustrated, hopeless, depressed. Yesterday I thought I just might snap my pencil in half. Best of luck, and you may find yourself coming back to it after a while. :)

 

Postby Ambiguity » Sat Jun 09, 2018 8:38 pm

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I quit for 4 years when I was younger, I came back eventually. If it's something you really love, you will too, so I wouldn't worry about it. Some people really enjoy it, but hate it when they make it a job too, no shame in that.

 

Postby Moe » Sat Jun 09, 2018 9:54 pm

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Well there is nothing wrong with quitting art. Don't feel bad about it. There is more to life than just art go explore other things maybe start a business, learn a new trade, travel, dance, etc etc
Yolo

 

Postby Kavilen » Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:09 am

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Okay, so, I know I've posted here quite a few times and Im pretty sure you guys are getting tired of it :lol:. Anyways, I dont want to stop. I feel empty without art and I keep getting random urges to draw. I feel like my mind is really confused about what I want to do. I think my problem is I get easily discouraged which is why I stop all too often. My question to you guys is how I can really start improving. I know practicing (dont worry, Ill be doing plenty of that), but I feel like my practice isnt getting me anywhere with the methods I use. Or, I guess I should say that my method doesnt seem to be progressing me at a fast rate. I feel that there is something that I am missing to be able to progress faster. Now, Im not asking for you guys to hold my hand the whole way there, but maybe just a point in the right direction. Any useful links or sights that I can use to help my perspective practice or gesture practice. Any good books, perhaps? Sorry for asking a lot... :?

 

Postby Josephcow » Tue Jun 12, 2018 4:38 pm

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You're at a tough place to help because none of us can decide on what is the most important thing to study, or what should be done first. You're at the beginning, with every single hurdle still in front of you. It takes a lot of trial and persistence before some of the fundamental concepts sink in, and until then it's a lot of bad drawings.

For example when I first started I discovered the loomis method of head construction using a ball and attaching forms to it. No matter how much I tried I could never really do it because I wasn't conceiving of and drawing form. I was just drawing a circle, and some lines, not a sphere. But now that I have a better conception of form, I have a chance at learning to construct. The more you learn, the easier it is to learn other related things in art. But when you're just starting, you don't have much experience to work with.

I would suggest to you based on my experience, engage in some sort of disciplined drawing exercise which is possible to succeed in. Whether it's the exercises on drawabox.com, or doing drawing accuracy practice. Like copying a drawing or photo and checking your work to see where you've made proportion mistakes. I wouldn't think of it so much as art, but more like you're going to learn a skill that will help you learn other skills. I think this is where most people go wrong. They see this kind study as un-artistic so they aren't even going to bother with it, or they do it for a few minutes and say "there, I did it." But they don't realize that it's a stepping stone to the art they they want to make, and sometimes things apply in ways that aren't apparent. Meanwhile keep trying to draw whatever you like, and stop looking at the clock waiting for the day where you'll suddenly get it. Everyone, including myself, is in too much of a rush these days. There is no way to speed your progress that I know of.

Also I think you expect too much from having been working on your drawing, I don't know, one or two years? Think about people that learn to play an instrument, or a language. Two years isn't gonna make you a pro pianist, or fluent in French.

If you're looking for books there's a reading list at CA.org forum which is also a good site.

 

Postby Snakebreath » Tue Jun 12, 2018 10:28 pm

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Best thing you can do is set yourself a schedule, pick a couple fundamental topics you want to improve on, and practice them for atleast an hour a day. Don't feel bad about taking a day off every week, whatever lets you not burn out! Those topics are different for everyone, some may need to do proportions, some anatomy, etc.

 

Postby perkexpert » Wed Jun 20, 2018 6:17 pm

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It's hard...i guess most important: Consistency and don't sit down with the expectation to get sth. awesome out of it. Just do it and start with just one line in mind. Do one single line at least every day...sometimes this line will evolve.
Things you could work at:
- Copy Art you like, for added pleasure, after you copied it, hide the original and draw what you remember
- Do basic form exercises, boxes, cylinders, cones, pheres in various perspectives, start drawing stuff out of it, like a car out of a box,
- light those basic forms with a dark, middle and light value as local color
- draw from life - in the park, subway, cafe, life drawing classes whatever, limit your materials
- try to understand what you do
- work through a art book you got, the Scott Robertson ones are absolutely amazing

and last....do what you do best....that musn't be art btw...i guess you probably like the idea of beeing a concept artist, but why do you have a hard time sitting down and solving problems? That would be your daily job then. Answer yourself the question, why you want to be a concept artist. If you want to be sth, act like you would be alrdy in that place. Sit down and find solutions for a chair. Draw 10 chairs, each one different. Pick one or two designs and do some more iterations. Render your best one to the best of your ability. Liked the process? Or did you only like the result. If you did, throw it away. How did that feel? I guess you have no clue what you want to do in your life, and that's OK. Many find the idea of drawing nice, as it's a thing thats connected with praise from others, "I would love to be so talented like you"....you felt special and you like that feeling. But is that enough to do this for a job? Find out, what it is like to work as a concept artist, what the daily tasks are...So some ideas for you to go through :) Keep on drawing! As for myself: I studied economics, have a master degree and work for an insurance company as a IT-specialist/programmer. Sounds not very interesting, but the ppl are nice, pay is good and i get to solve a lot of problems - which is what i like. Doing Art is also solving problems for me. Art was always there and at the moment i'm just trying to get better. Maybe it will stay a fulfilling hobby forever, maybe sth will evolve out of it. We will see :)
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