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Postby PineapplePants » Sun May 21, 2017 4:28 am

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Subject title: Fantasy Pic

It's supposed to be my final 20 hour project to conclude my first year, and I've definitely crossed that milestone, but everything about it just feels off? I wanted to make it into a painting in the style of 'The Swing,' but I feel like it hasn't clicked together. I've pretty much never done something of this caliber.

What can I do to make it better?

Screen Shot 2017-05-20 at 11.27.08 PM.png

 

Postby Josephcow » Sun May 21, 2017 5:12 am

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Do you mean The Swing by Fragonard?

I kind of see what you mean, in the way that not everything feels harmonious, or like it's all part of the same scene. Although i like what you are doing with the linework, especially the left side of the painting intrigues me with the simplified rocks and waterfall. It's like it's unfinished, but it doesn't feel like it. It does look on purpose and i think it is, so that's good. But then with the foam at the bottom of the waterfall, we get a completely different feel because it's the only thing that looks painted with a brush. It's the only thing that has texture so it looks odd.

The other contributor to disharmony could be scale elements. The tiny figure on the right is so small, but isn't any less detailed than the large tree person. All that detail in a small space draws the eye over there even though the most interesting part should be on the dude in the middle. It kind of looks like it was a figure drawn the same size as the tree, and then shrunk using photoshop tools. Whether this was the case or not, it makes it feel cut and paste to me. That might just be my opinion though.

 

Postby giwayume » Sun May 21, 2017 5:27 am

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You can definitely use some better construction in your drawing. Show perspective on both the characters and the background.

"The Swing" isn't a piece with flat colors. Also there is quite a bit of contrast between the foreground and background in that picture (background colors are nearly black), with the main focal point being on the woman since her dress has different colors (pink) than the rest of the picture (blue/green).

I suggest you shade your picture in grayscale first to get your lighting down. Then add a combined hue/saturation layer or adjustment layer to color your image. Make sure you use high contrast when shading, black and white. Areas hit by light should have a wider range of shades available to them than areas in shadow.

If you want your colors to look right, try to have less variation, and tone down the saturation of your colors A LOT. Saturated colors should be preserved for areas hit directly by light.

You also might have better luck if you ditch your line art entirely and show the forms only with shading. Something to try out.

 

Postby Josephcow » Sun May 21, 2017 5:59 pm

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giwayume is right if you are going for a style of painting such as The Swing. But those guidelines do not apply to a more cartoony style. Like I wouldn't just start rendering things with light and shade in this painting like they are realistic, because it looks to me like they are not meant to be. But if that is your long term goal, it would be best to start studying lighting and form. It's something you should study anyway, but on a different painting probably.

 

Postby giwayume » Sun May 21, 2017 6:54 pm

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What I've mentioned doesn't necessarily apply to realism, they're just basic tips on how to make a painting look solid.

Most shading styles in comics do take realism into account but they exaggerate things like the colors, gradations, shift in tones, etc.

Image

 

Postby Josephcow » Sun May 21, 2017 8:58 pm

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True, I was just saying OP's painting is just flat colors. It doesn't really have any tones to apply those things to.

 

Postby PineapplePants » Wed May 24, 2017 1:38 pm

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Hey guys, thank you for all your helpful comments!

The reason why it's flat colored and looked half done was, well, because it was lol. I stopped halfway through it and knew if I continued it would just become even more of a mess. I'm now starting over on the coloring. I did a quick greyscale and now I'm roughly putting colors in. Thoughts? (Image is low quality due to me uploading from mobile)

IMG_574.jpg

 

Postby Josephcow » Wed May 24, 2017 4:11 pm

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In that case block in everything first. Beware the danger of rendering one area and leaving the rest for later. I can't really tell you much right now if it's working well because it is so rough, and you only put in half the colors. and also, follow giwayume's advice. I thought it was finished since you said you spent 20 hours on it?

 

Postby giwayume » Thu May 25, 2017 1:28 am

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Really think about what surfaces the sun is hitting in your image, and what it isn't. I'm assuming the sun is somewhere off the top left of your image behind the viewpoint, based on the shading of your tree character. Make the planes that face the sun brighter than ones closer to a perpendicular direction from the sun. The grass and other ground planes would be some of the brightest values in the image during daylight since they're facing the sun the most, except where they are covered by cast shadows. Vertical surfaces in the image would get less light from the sun and would be darker, unless the sun is at a lower angle. Also think about the cast shadows, under the bench, and cast shadows from tree leaves on the ground and the trunks of the trees.

I see you're getting into the darker values, but also don't forget the bright white values. The entire image seems to be washed in gray which isn't helping to distinguish the lighting of the image.

 

Postby perkexpert » Thu May 25, 2017 9:46 pm

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Hmmm, i feel tempted to do an overpaint, but to be honest, id mash up the whole picture. Plz tell us, what is this scene all about? Story? Mood? What are the maincharacters? Whats the focus/ focal point? Where is the light coming from? If you answer all this, i might have (or other aspiring paintovereres :) ) a much better grasp on going in a direction you wanted. The problem would be, if i chose all this for myself, i might set you up on another path...btw...if you really spent much time on this, grats first, but probably you should focus on the planning first, before laying down a single line ( a failure i did time and time again :) .
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Postby PineapplePants » Tue May 30, 2017 3:53 am

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Hey guys! Thanks again for all your comments! Here's another update of my picture. Not a lot improvement due to a busy memorial weekend. Still haven't tackled the snake/mushroom girl or the man due to fear of painting humans, lol. And yeah, perkexpert, you can repaint it if you want! I'd love to see someone's take on how to do this. The light is coming in from the left and the story is basically a guy taking a break, reading the newspaper. He sits down at a park where it jokingly has a sign that says 'beware of fairies.' Unaware to the fact that there are actual fairies around, surrounding him.


1.png

 

Postby perkexpert » Tue May 30, 2017 10:08 pm

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Ahh...ok...i see, now i get the idea with the "swing" a lot better. Maybe ill try it out :)
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Postby giwayume » Mon Jun 05, 2017 6:44 pm

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It's starting to look much better overall, but I suggest you take a jab at shading/coloring your human characters if that's what you have difficulty with. We can't help you improve them otherwise.

 

Postby Alpacky » Fri Jun 09, 2017 4:29 am

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I dont know what the whole shading thing is about...
the main issue I see here is your environment building skills, sense of depth, and composition...


heres where I say something kinda rude.
It looks like you had a child draw a "landscape"
and then a fairly well verse adult/teen draw in characters, based on what the kid asked
sort of mean, and im sorry, but its the best way I can explain what I see.

Everything is prettymuch in the foreground, the background is just gray
theres hardly any depth really,

Its the difference between this:
green-grass-landscape-cartoon-kids-jumping-cute-73386035.jpg


And this:
oil-painting-from-the-beginning-of-20-century-from-unknown-czech-author-F5HFAJ.jpg
I draw stuff sometimes and it looks like this: (Latest work on page 8)http://forum.sycra.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=76279


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