Submit your artwork for critiques here, or give someone else some helpful criticism or advice on their artwork. Please keep things civil.

Moderators: Ambiguity, SeaQuenchal, Waveloop, imcostalong, virtueone

 

Postby Zargogo » Fri Jan 06, 2012 5:04 am

  Zargogo
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:49 am
Location: Canada

Subject title: No Reference Drawing

I drew this in a couple of hours some weeks/month ago.I purposefully did not complete the legs so as not to take away from the "flow" of the drawing. Any criticisms?

I also forgot to make the background white after switching from grayscale :P
Half-Drawn Knight Coloured.jpg

 

Postby Stoyben » Fri Jan 06, 2012 5:17 am

User avatar
  Stoyben
Posts: 61
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 9:15 pm

I purposefully did not complete the legs so as not to take away from the "flow"


Drawing the legs would not mess up the flow as long as they aren't going in the opposite direction. Also there are some of stray lines that you might want to remove to make it seem less "sketchy". But other then that I say it's a great drawing.
You can't spell earth without art.

 

Postby Matej » Fri Jan 06, 2012 10:11 am

User avatar
  Matej
Posts: 176
Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2011 3:19 pm
Location: Slovenia

Hope this helps.

Image
Image

 

Postby Zargogo » Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:21 am

  Zargogo
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:49 am
Location: Canada

Haha, thanks guys!

 

Postby Sycra » Fri Jan 06, 2012 7:10 pm

User avatar
  Sycra
Site Admin
Posts: 210
Joined: Tue Dec 27, 2011 1:32 pm

I think you gotta be honest, did you really not draw the legs because of some kind of flow thing or because really, you just have trouble with drawing legs? If you have trouble, then it's a good time to start practicing on that.

 

Postby Zargogo » Fri Jan 06, 2012 9:47 pm

  Zargogo
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:49 am
Location: Canada

Sycra wrote:I think you gotta be honest, did you really not draw the legs because of some kind of flow thing or because really, you just have trouble with drawing legs? If you have trouble, then it's a good time to start practicing on that.

It was mostly out of laziness, I guess I added the "flow" thing as an excuse... :)

You can see from the drawing I posted on Mumrik's Sketchbook that I'm not that bad at legs.

 

Postby Cartesian Theater » Sat Jan 07, 2012 2:24 am

  Cartesian Theater
Posts: 75
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 10:10 pm
Location: Richmond, Virginia, USA

When I started drawing I had a lot of misconceptions about why professional painters do the things they do. It seems like they use these really low opacity brushes, scribble a lot, leave solid backgrounds and keep bits of sketchy lines visible, so maybe that makes art look more artistic right? It turns out these are all signs of an unfinished painting. The reason many famous works of art have such problems is that they were actually never finished (Fun fact: Leonardo da Vinci was likely ADHD and almost never finished a painting). However, the ideal is not to have a painting with many scribbly lines and low opacity strokes, but to get a solid picture with strong shapes and confident values. For now, try just using solid brushes until it's time to blend, draw the complete pose out so you know where your character is, and maybe someday when you're famous you can be really cocky and say that you left it unfinished for aesthetic purposes.

 

Postby Zargogo » Sat Jan 07, 2012 6:17 am

  Zargogo
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:49 am
Location: Canada

Cartesian Theater wrote:When I started drawing I had a lot of misconceptions about why professional painters do the things they do. It seems like they use these really low opacity brushes, scribble a lot, leave solid backgrounds and keep bits of sketchy lines visible, so maybe that makes art look more artistic right? It turns out these are all signs of an unfinished painting. The reason many famous works of art have such problems is that they were actually never finished (Fun fact: Leonardo da Vinci was likely ADHD and almost never finished a painting). However, the ideal is not to have a painting with many scribbly lines and low opacity strokes, but to get a solid picture with strong shapes and confident values. For now, try just using solid brushes until it's time to blend, draw the complete pose out so you know where your character is, and maybe someday when you're famous you can be really cocky and say that you left it unfinished for aesthetic purposes.


I have a problem with drawing straight, solid lines. I just can't do it. Every time I draw something on a tablet or paper I make a bunch of "little" lines that eventually form a "larger", straight line. It's like all of my drawings are sketches. :( Is it an art-style sort of problem?

 

Postby Cartesian Theater » Sat Jan 07, 2012 6:20 am

  Cartesian Theater
Posts: 75
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 10:10 pm
Location: Richmond, Virginia, USA

Zargogo wrote:
I have a problem with drawing straight, solid lines. I just can't do it. Every time I draw something on a tablet or paper I make a bunch of "little" lines that eventually form a "larger", straight line. It's like all of my drawings are sketches. :( Is it an art-style sort of problem?

That's not a problem. It's really hard to draw straight lines with a tablet, especially if it's a tiny one like mine! If you're going for a straight line then the best bet is to draw a quick sketch, then line over it either using the pen tool or zoomed it super close so you can swoosh around, then erase a lot. Line art in Photoshop is a pain in the ass. But why do you need to use straight lines? You can always use a solid brush to paint strokes over each other, unless you dislike that look.

 

Postby Zargogo » Sat Jan 07, 2012 9:46 am

  Zargogo
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:49 am
Location: Canada

Cartesian Theater wrote:
Zargogo wrote:
I have a problem with drawing straight, solid lines. I just can't do it. Every time I draw something on a tablet or paper I make a bunch of "little" lines that eventually form a "larger", straight line. It's like all of my drawings are sketches. :( Is it an art-style sort of problem?

That's not a problem. It's really hard to draw straight lines with a tablet, especially if it's a tiny one like mine! If you're going for a straight line then the best bet is to draw a quick sketch, then line over it either using the pen tool or zoomed it super close so you can swoosh around, then erase a lot. Line art in Photoshop is a pain in the ass. But why do you need to use straight lines? You can always use a solid brush to paint strokes over each other, unless you dislike that look.

What do you mean by "use a solid brush to paint strokes over each other"?..

 

Postby Cartesian Theater » Sat Jan 07, 2012 6:21 pm

  Cartesian Theater
Posts: 75
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 10:10 pm
Location: Richmond, Virginia, USA

You've seen some of Sycra's speedpaintings, right? He usually starts with some sort of base color and then uses a set opacity brush to develop it more and add value/color. Personally I often start by just blocking in solid chunks of color with a 100% hardness, 100% opacity brush with only brush size set to pen pressure. Then I can go in with a 35% opacity brush to add value/color, then only at the end will I use a 5-15% brush to blend. If you don't know *exactly* where you intend your brush to fall, using a low opacity brush will only look messy and confusing. Every line should be intentional, so if you make a lot of mistakes it's best to work with solid lines that you can paint over rather than low opacity "muddy" lines.

 

Postby sahrab » Sat Jan 07, 2012 7:44 pm

User avatar
  sahrab
Posts: 62
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 7:56 pm

just a suggestion i like the way you drew him but why instead of legs why not make him a ghost ? maybe like a fallen warrior ghost stuff cuz it looks cool without legs imo but that depends on what you want though

 

Postby Zargogo » Sat Jan 07, 2012 9:39 pm

  Zargogo
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:49 am
Location: Canada

Cartesian Theater wrote:You've seen some of Sycra's speedpaintings, right? He usually starts with some sort of base color and then uses a set opacity brush to develop it more and add value/color. Personally I often start by just blocking in solid chunks of color with a 100% hardness, 100% opacity brush with only brush size set to pen pressure. Then I can go in with a 35% opacity brush to add value/color, then only at the end will I use a 5-15% brush to blend. If you don't know *exactly* where you intend your brush to fall, using a low opacity brush will only look messy and confusing. Every line should be intentional, so if you make a lot of mistakes it's best to work with solid lines that you can paint over rather than low opacity "muddy" lines.


But you're talking about a whole different way to draw, aren't you? I mean, I start my drawings by outlining my subjects and their garments with lines, then I proceed to draw the shadows in grayscale, and finally I go to CMYK or RBG and colour the drawing. From what I've seen Sycra has an intense mental picture of what he's going to draw before he starts and as a result doesn't need to outline anything, but rather skips to the shading/colouring phase at the start. Right?

 

Postby Cartesian Theater » Sat Jan 07, 2012 9:51 pm

  Cartesian Theater
Posts: 75
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2012 10:10 pm
Location: Richmond, Virginia, USA

Zargogo wrote:But you're talking about a whole different way to draw, aren't you? I mean, I start my drawings by outlining my subjects and their garments with lines, then I proceed to draw the shadows in grayscale, and finally I go to CMYK or RBG and colour the drawing. From what I've seen Sycra has an intense mental picture of what he's going to draw before he starts and as a result doesn't need to outline anything, but rather skips to the shading/colouring phase at the start. Right?

Yes, I am. You can of course continue what you've been doing, but it's actually much easier to work in cleaner brush strokes. You don't need to have a mental image of what you're going to draw, though it is incredibly useful if you do. But when you don't, using strokes kind of randomly is going to end in chaos. Even if you don't know what it is you're drawing, use intent with every line. Every stroke you make should have a purpose, because without purpose lines create chaos and confusion. The difference is between "Okay I'm going to scribble this brush around this area and try to make it look round" and "I'm going to place a darker tone here because I know it will give a nice shape and depth to this object." Scribbling is for sketching out ideas, not for finishing touches.

 

Postby Zargogo » Sun Jan 08, 2012 1:16 am

  Zargogo
Posts: 53
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 4:49 am
Location: Canada

Cartesian Theater wrote:
Zargogo wrote:But you're talking about a whole different way to draw, aren't you? I mean, I start my drawings by outlining my subjects and their garments with lines, then I proceed to draw the shadows in grayscale, and finally I go to CMYK or RBG and colour the drawing. From what I've seen Sycra has an intense mental picture of what he's going to draw before he starts and as a result doesn't need to outline anything, but rather skips to the shading/colouring phase at the start. Right?

Yes, I am. You can of course continue what you've been doing, but it's actually much easier to work in cleaner brush strokes. You don't need to have a mental image of what you're going to draw, though it is incredibly useful if you do. But when you don't, using strokes kind of randomly is going to end in chaos. Even if you don't know what it is you're drawing, use intent with every line. Every stroke you make should have a purpose, because without purpose lines create chaos and confusion. The difference is between "Okay I'm going to scribble this brush around this area and try to make it look round" and "I'm going to place a darker tone here because I know it will give a nice shape and depth to this object." Scribbling is for sketching out ideas, not for finishing touches.

This is awesome advice! Thank you.


Return to Critique This!

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests