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Postby Ajumani » Sun Feb 11, 2018 5:34 pm

  Ajumani
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Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 3:20 am

Subject title: Upside down drawings critique

Hii everyone ive recently picked up right side of the brain book (Edwards) that everyones been talking about here and I've tried to do a couple of the excersizes
In the book so far and im a little frustrated at myself trying the upside-down art.

my proportions keep getting skewed as I work my way up and it ends up not looking like the original picture that much and
Im scared i wont be able to get better at this


But i do feel focused and at ease when i draw does that mean im using my R mode even if slight? Should I keep doing these upside down drawings untill I get better or is it safe to move onto the next chapter?

Any tips and advice on how to get better at this would be great!
(Sorry for the bad quality photos i don't have a scanner currently)
https://imgur.com/a/NH7bK

 

Postby Audiazif » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:55 am

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  Audiazif
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I think it would be better if you forget the whole left and right brain stuff. It is a popular belief and although there is some truth to it, the whole concept has been blown out of proportion (kind of the same thing happened with the "we only use 10% of our brains" thing). At the very least take what is said about left and right brain with a grain of salt. That being said the exercises help to get you to draw what you see.

To get a drawing more proportional you need to constantly relate the lines, shapes, and angles you draw to one another and to the whole image. Looking for vertical and horizontal alignments of things helps too. An example would be in the Picasso copy, there is a vertical line that almost aligns with the outer line of the chair's support for the arm and the mans armpit (in your copy you missed this and other alignments).
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Postby Josephcow » Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:48 am

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The left brain/right brain concept isn't really true in the way that there's not necessarily such a complete divide between Left and Right hemispheres of your brain. However, there is indeed a different 'mode' of seeing which you need to try to unlock and use as much as possible. You must learn to see things in a different, more objective way, and you can think of what's happening in your brain however you like. So just because a psychologist would laugh at some of the things Edwards says about the brain, doesn't mean there isn't truth in it.

Continuously try to look at the whole. Look for relationships between parts and don't get distracted by drawing an eye or a hand because this breaks your objective vision.

The upside down exercise is just to trick you into doing this, to prove to you that you can do it. I wouldn't belabor them much longer. These drawings look good mostly, and I would move on. You can always go back and try them again.

If parts of your drawing are distorted, it probably means you are kind of starting in one place and working your way across the drawing instead of relating the smaller parts to the whole. Don't get discouraged, this is extremely difficult to do.

 

Postby Ajumani » Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:17 pm

  Ajumani
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 3:20 am

Audiazif wrote:I think it would be better if you forget the whole left and right brain stuff. It is a popular belief and although there is some truth to it, the whole concept has been blown out of proportion (kind of the same thing happened with the "we only use 10% of our brains" thing). At the very least take what is said about left and right brain with a grain of salt. That being said the exercises help to get you to draw what you see.

To get a drawing more proportional you need to constantly relate the lines, shapes, and angles you draw to one another and to the whole image. Looking for vertical and horizontal alignments of things helps too. An example would be in the Picasso copy, there is a vertical line that almost aligns with the outer line of the chair's support for the arm and the mans armpit (in your copy you missed this and other alignments).
Proportions are always something i struggle with...i think adding a border and some sight lines would have definitely helped me out but since the exercise didnt instruct me to do i didnt bother (im trying to do the exercises exactly as written) but thanks so much for the tips and advice ill take everything into consideration.

Are my drawings ok or do they still need some work? Do you also think it'd  be safe to move on to the next chapters in the book now? (Since this is still fairly early on)

 

Postby Ajumani » Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:18 pm

  Ajumani
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 3:20 am

Josephcow wrote:The left brain/right brain concept isn't really true in the way that there's not necessarily such a complete divide between Left and Right hemispheres of your brain. However, there is indeed a different 'mode' of seeing which you need to try to unlock and use as much as possible. You must learn to see things in a different, more objective way, and you can think of what's happening in your brain however you like. So just because a psychologist would laugh at some of the things Edwards says about the brain, doesn't mean there isn't truth in it.

Continuously try to look at the whole. Look for relationships between parts and don't get distracted by drawing an eye or a hand because this breaks your objective vision.

The upside down exercise is just to trick you into doing this, to prove to you that you can do it. I wouldn't belabor them much longer. These drawings look good mostly, and I would move on. You can always go back and try them again.

If parts of your drawing are distorted, it probably means you are kind of starting in one place and working your way across the drawing instead of relating the smaller parts to the whole. Don't get discouraged, this is extremely difficult to do.
Thank you so much for answering and helping out. I definitely wouldnt have known better and took this book a lot more word for word? If that makes sense? since im not familiar with psychology or anything haha.

Do you have any tips on how to help with the whole relationship thing? Sorry english isnt really my first language but im a little confused about what you mean by "relating the smaller parts to the whole"

but as long as I can focus on everything as lines and not objects or things it should be fine for now and move on to the next chapters?

I get discouraged seeing all other people get really nice upside down drawings and good proportions even though both me and them are doing the same thing? I know i probably should not let that effect me much but it makes me feel like i can do so much better and i keep trying only to fall short again (due to proportions or mabye i place something wrong)

It really helped me out knowing i dont have to be perfect and move onwards so thanks so much again. :D

 

Postby Josephcow » Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:17 pm

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audiazif's suggestion is probably the best. Look for where things line up vertically or horizontally. Also work on the whole drawing at once, don't start with one area and work your way across the page. Take a step back often and compare your drawing and the thing your copying and ask yourself "what's different about mine?". What I mean about relating the smaller parts to the whole, is how big is something like the head compared to the entire drawing?

I like to start my drawings by making some marks indicating the height and width of the thing I'm drawing.

I really wouldn't worry about being perfect. Just do your best getting through the book, and then later you can do more practice.

 

Postby Ajumani » Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:26 pm

  Ajumani
Posts: 18
Joined: Sat Feb 10, 2018 3:20 am

Josephcow wrote:audiazif's suggestion is probably the best. Look for where things line up vertically or horizontally. Also work on the whole drawing at once, don't start with one area and work your way across the page. Take a step back often and compare your drawing and the thing your copying and ask yourself "what's different about mine?". What I mean about relating the smaller parts to the whole, is how big is something like the head compared to the entire drawing?

I like to start my drawings by making some marks indicating the height and width of the thing I'm drawing.

I really wouldn't worry about being perfect. Just do your best getting through the book, and then later you can do more practice.

Ahh ok i think i understand now! If you focusing on one part of the drawing it will be hard to compare relationships?
Thanks for the help i appriciate it very much :D i will take your advice as i move foward into the book


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