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Postby Iksnerogib » Fri Dec 29, 2017 11:19 am

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  Iksnerogib
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Location: Brazil

Subject title: NSFW - Female figure study.

Hi, this is an anatomy study.
Feedback and critiques highly appreciated.

colorStudyNudeLOWRES.jpg


Painting process: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOkqdCYCW5s
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Postby Josephcow » Fri Dec 29, 2017 11:31 pm

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  Josephcow
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Pretty good! nice work.
I watched your video to see what your process is, because usually if there are problems they have something to do with what you are doing at the beginning of the process. it's how you start.

So the problem is that you are overmodeling some of the smaller forms, the bones and muscles and such that are sticking out. For instance that edge around the bottom of her belly you've made way too hard. It's barely visible in the ref because that is a soft change in the form. It doesn't turn very far it's just a small bump. You want to avoid over-stating small value changes like that because it makes certain body parts stick out more than is natural. Making the person look emaciated, or old. (same logic as when you make a laugh line on a portrait too dark, model looks old).

And the reflected light is similarly a little exaggerated. It's very strong in the reference, but it's safer to play it down at first. squint at the reference and play down value changes that disappear when squinting. be more subtle. I feel that these problems can be traced to how you start.

You never fully separated your light and shadow. You started modeling muscles right away. I would start by blocking in the shadows where you see the core shadow. Fill in the entire shadow with an even tone. Modeling the shadow side with reflected light can be done later. Also you need to spend time deciding definitively what is in shadow and what is not. You've done pretty well with this save for a few areas like the neck and the right leg.

On the lit side, fill in an even tone for the whole thing, and then break it into simple planes. The belly faces down, so it is all a darker halftone. Where the body turns into shadow is also very important to show the roundness of the whole thing, so that can be a darker half tone. So there's really only three different values used on the light side, and two in the shadow.

This is a simplified statement of all the important structures of the figure. Then you can keep getting more specific while working in the general ranges of tone established.I would want to have something like this at the beginning stage before doing a more detailed study of the anatomy. And you did sort of do this, but within 30 seconds you had pushed the reflected light to be as bright as the lit side. You didn't block in the actual colors and values that you were going to use.

colorStudyNudeLOW3RES.jpg
colorStudyNudeLOWRES.jpg


side not I did change the colors, but it really isn't the color that is a problem. Though you do tend to make things rather grey.

PS you have good taste in music.

 

Postby Iksnerogib » Sat Dec 30, 2017 3:51 pm

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Location: Brazil

Josephcow wrote:Pretty good! nice work.
I watched your video to see what your process is, because usually if there are problems they have something to do with what you are doing at the beginning of the process. it's how you start.

So the problem is that you are overmodeling some of the smaller forms, the bones and muscles and such that are sticking out. For instance that edge around the bottom of her belly you've made way too hard. It's barely visible in the ref because that is a soft change in the form. It doesn't turn very far it's just a small bump. You want to avoid over-stating small value changes like that because it makes certain body parts stick out more than is natural. Making the person look emaciated, or old. (same logic as when you make a laugh line on a portrait too dark, model looks old).
...


First of all, thanks a lot for taking the time to do such an in-depth critique.
I can see exactly what you're saying when I look at the image now. guess I was thinking about all the bumps and not the whole masses.
Thanks!

Josephcow wrote:PS you have good taste in music.

Both of us have then :D
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