Submit your artwork for critiques here, or give someone else some helpful criticism or advice on their artwork. Please keep things civil.

Moderators: Ambiguity, SeaQuenchal, Waveloop, imcostalong, virtueone

 

Postby ehlihr » Fri Dec 08, 2017 6:03 pm

User avatar
  ehlihr
Posts: 401
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2014 12:13 am
Location: Canada

Subject title: roast me pt. 2 [ehlihr]

uuhhhhhhhh??? here's a Nother One please lemme know if it's like. good?
Screen Shot 2017-12-08 at 12.02.04 PM.png
18 year old mostly self taught loser. sheridan illustration 2023

Sketchbook
Website
Instagram

 

Postby Audiazif » Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:15 pm

User avatar
  Audiazif
Posts: 901
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2015 5:38 am

The color is a little weird. It is kind of doing the opposite of what happens in reality. Your lights are saturated and your darks have little to no saturation (basically grey). In life, lights tend to be less saturation than the shadows. Also shadows are not "grey" or black, they have color in them. I am also confused on the lighting. It is not clear how things are being lit. Is this back lit? or is it two light sources from the sides? If it is back lit, the light is going too far around into the form and the bg is too dark. If it is two light sources it may read better if one of the light sources is a dominant and then the other is a secondary, one is more intense than the other. Also the sharp edges of the shadows read like a cast shadow, almost like the figure is front lit and something is casting a shadow on the figure. I would try to think of the shadows as cast shadows(sharp edges) or model shadows(soft edges) and learn where each type would show up.
"Painting is edge hell!"

Deviantart
Sketchbook

 

Postby Josephcow » Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:45 pm

User avatar
  Josephcow
Posts: 830
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:46 pm

Audiazif wrote:The color is a little weird. It is kind of doing the opposite of what happens in reality. Your lights are saturated and your darks have little to no saturation (basically grey). In life, lights tend to be less saturation than the shadows.


I agree with your critique except this simply isn't true.

OP, if there are 2 of the same light source on either side of the guy's head, that's the only way this can make sense. But if that were the case we would see a form shadow not a cast shadow at the boundaries of the shadow (meaning it would have a soft edge as the light turns away, not a hard line which indicated either a corner, or a cast shadow. Even if gradients are not in the 'rules' of your style, there might be other ways to represent the edge so that it makes more sense. Also the proportions don't seem optimal to me. The nose and mouth could be shrunk quite a bit, it feels like the chin is being crowded.

 

Postby Audiazif » Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:52 am

User avatar
  Audiazif
Posts: 901
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2015 5:38 am

@Josephcow What part is not true?
"Painting is edge hell!"

Deviantart
Sketchbook

 

Postby ehlihr » Sun Dec 10, 2017 2:36 am

User avatar
  ehlihr
Posts: 401
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2014 12:13 am
Location: Canada

Audiazif wrote:The color is a little weird. It is kind of doing the opposite of what happens in reality. Your lights are saturated and your darks have little to no saturation (basically grey). In life, lights tend to be less saturation than the shadows. Also shadows are not "grey" or black, they have color in them. I am also confused on the lighting. It is not clear how things are being lit. Is this back lit? or is it two light sources from the sides? If it is back lit, the light is going too far around into the form and the bg is too dark. If it is two light sources it may read better if one of the light sources is a dominant and then the other is a secondary, one is more intense than the other. Also the sharp edges of the shadows read like a cast shadow, almost like the figure is front lit and something is casting a shadow on the figure. I would try to think of the shadows as cast shadows(sharp edges) or model shadows(soft edges) and learn where each type would show up.


oh boy wow there's more than i thought but this is super constructive thank you!!! ill try and do a repaint or a paintover with this in mind (i need to do some shadow studies because i honestly had no idea wtf cast and form shadows were till i googled them) so this is great!!!

the intention was for it to be backlit, which i tried to make more "dramatic" but i guess i just ... didn't do good??? im really bad at making sure to use references so ill try to be more diligent!! i have another backlit drawing (this was the second one i did after the one under the spoiler) that i think may be better but i honestly don't know?

Spoiler: show
Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 1.53.59 PM.png


either way thank you!!! this was great critique and i Appreciate it (tm)


Josephcow wrote:
Audiazif wrote:The color is a little weird. It is kind of doing the opposite of what happens in reality. Your lights are saturated and your darks have little to no saturation (basically grey). In life, lights tend to be less saturation than the shadows.


I agree with your critique except this simply isn't true.

OP, if there are 2 of the same light source on either side of the guy's head, that's the only way this can make sense. But if that were the case we would see a form shadow not a cast shadow at the boundaries of the shadow (meaning it would have a soft edge as the light turns away, not a hard line which indicated either a corner, or a cast shadow. Even if gradients are not in the 'rules' of your style, there might be other ways to represent the edge so that it makes more sense. Also the proportions don't seem optimal to me. The nose and mouth could be shrunk quite a bit, it feels like the chin is being crowded.


yeah the light sources are goofed and i definitely need to work with backlighting more. also totally see the issue with the anatomy!! this painting was the first in this particular style that ive been trying to develop so theres absolutely room to grow. thank you again!!!

Audiazif wrote:@Josephcow What part is not true?


i think they meant the bit with the colour, which also confused me - i didn't use any blacks or grays in my drawing (i usually find it super gross and unappealing, and tend to really saturate my art with colour) and used a violet and blue to shade - it is possible it was too desaturated but hell if i know lol
18 year old mostly self taught loser. sheridan illustration 2023

Sketchbook
Website
Instagram

 

Postby Fantelle » Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:58 pm

User avatar
  Fantelle
Posts: 833
Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2014 2:00 pm
Location: Belgium

    if i'm not wrong, midtones are always the most saturated (specifically the terminator - transition between
    a midtone and light/shadow)? nd then both lights and shadows will have less saturation? i could be wrong

    like in this photo

    Spoiler: show
    Image


    edit: i think this is easier to understand , by cg cookie in this video

    Image

    so we see mainly hue variation here, but if u look at the terminator (the dotted line) it's the most saturated color

 

Postby Audiazif » Sun Dec 10, 2017 7:26 pm

User avatar
  Audiazif
Posts: 901
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2015 5:38 am

Maybe my statement was a little over simplified and it depends on the color and type lighting and material but I mean it seems to be true for the most part from what I have seen. I mean take the image Fantelle and color pick the light areas and compare the saturation to the dark areas. The saturation is grater in the shadows with exception of the occluded areas. Again this depends on a lot of factors and like every "rule" in color it can have situations where it is not true.
"Painting is edge hell!"

Deviantart
Sketchbook

 

Postby Josephcow » Sun Dec 10, 2017 7:48 pm

User avatar
  Josephcow
Posts: 830
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:46 pm

It's true only half the time. The other half of the time the opposite it true. It depends on the local color and the color of the light. If there is a yellow light on a blue object the blue object appears more grey. But if a blue light shines on a blue object the objects color is intensified. So in skin, because it's orange, an orange light will make it more saturated, while a blue one will make it less so.

Plus, the shadow side of objects is not connected to the lit side at all. It's just what the object looks like lit by every light source excluding the main one. So to say the shadow side should be a certain way because the lit side is one way doesn't really make sense. The light isn't touching the shadow, so it doesn't affect it though it may affect our perception of it.

We have to look to life for answers. Not photos or paintings. There is no photo that would prove what I'm saying because we are talking about real life. It seems that nature doesn't give a damn about our rules.

I have to agree that the shadow in the painting would look better if it were less grey, though. I apologize if I came off as confrontational.

 

Postby ehlihr » Fri Dec 15, 2017 3:14 am

User avatar
  ehlihr
Posts: 401
Joined: Tue Jul 15, 2014 12:13 am
Location: Canada

hey guys thank you so much!!! i resketched it (mostly focused on the anatomy aspect but im working on the shading for when i eventually repaint!! tysm :3
Screen Shot 2017-12-14 at 9.07.56 PM.png
18 year old mostly self taught loser. sheridan illustration 2023

Sketchbook
Website
Instagram

 

Postby Josephcow » Fri Dec 15, 2017 5:54 am

User avatar
  Josephcow
Posts: 830
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2014 9:46 pm

Nice! I like these proportions a lot better! I do have a couple suggestions.

You might want to start in the future with the kind of standard proportions for a face (divided in thirds from top of head to hairline, hairline to brow, brow to bottom of nose, and nose to chin, then halfway between those are bottom of eyelid, and bottom of lower lip) , and then change it from there, versus starting with extreme proportions and then having to normalize it. This way you are more in control of what you want to exaggerate. If you want to make the nose bigger, you can do it knowing exactly how much bigger than 'normal' you're going for.

Assuming this is based on the actor from Merlin you may want to include certain features. He has a very square chin, prominent cheekbones, wide set eyes, and ears that stick out. This is perfect for designing a character in your style. If wanted to go for a different look that's okay, though. But I would want the ears to be featured more in the silhouette of the portrait more like what you had at first.

For the lighting and colors, something that has helped me is to think in simple 'blocks' of color. I think of the colors and values like a jigsaw puzzle with as few pieces as possible. And then I just keep changing the colors of the pieces until it achieves the effect I want. Then use those colors to start painting your actual piece with linework. This tends to get strong results because you aren't attached to the local color so much or the outlines. You can just look for color relationship. And it's really easy to change a color when there are only 6-9 to worry about. I'm imagining two torches behind him on either side. And this makes his skin very saturated in the light, grey and cool in the shadow. but the blue shirt very grey in the light.

Not saying you should change everything to look just like this. Just a different way of thinking about it.
merlin1.png
merlin2.png

 

Postby Markdawg » Sun Dec 24, 2017 2:03 am

  Markdawg
Posts: 50
Joined: Thu Dec 21, 2017 10:39 am
Location: Idaho Falls, ID

Can you explain to me the light on the hair with the first one? The second one looks better.


Return to Critique This!

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests

cron